Tuesday, 19 January 2021

Eschewing Clingfilm - making bees wax wrap

 

Hello All

I don't know about you but his wet weather is starting to get me down a tad. I have huge amounts of brash and prunings to burn and there is not a chance at the mo. I am also trying to help the lock-down hens be happier, but am slipping and sliding in the mud and making little progress. Pushing a  wheelbarrow about in it is such hard work.

 We are trying to get the fruit trees pruned too, I guess some may have to go without this year. Let's face it, it might be poor gardening but it isn't life threatening so we will be philosophical  and do the best we can.

Continuing  my sustainability theme. Here is a sort of "tutorial (get me!)

I have never been a fan of cling film. Though it is a very convenient, it is single use, and un-recyclable .  An alternative way to cover dishes etc is to use bees wax wrap.  As I keep bees it is s no brainer for me. If you wanted to make your own I would say that an ounce of beeswax would do two dinner plate size wraps. The first pic shows what is needed, Cotton fabric off cut cut into shape with pinking shears., a block of bees wax; a grater to grate the wax ( in the jar) two sheets of greaseproof and an iron and ironing cloth.

pre heat iron to high.
on your ironing cloth place a sheet of greaseproof,  a sprinkling of grated wax, followed by a second sheet of greaseproof
Iron over the greaseproof , as the bees wax melts use the iron to spread ir over the cloth evenly.
The wax  will spread outside the fabric as it melts ensuring all is covered
Peel off the top layer of greaseproof from both sides and hold the cloth up for a minute and when cool it is ready to use. Here is is over a bowl .
The excess wax on the greaseproof can be peeled off and put back in the jar.
Hope that was clear.
Enough for now
Back soon
Gillx


14 comments:

  1. Never heard of this before. I have friends who keep bees - I must ask them if they have heard of it.

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    1. They may well have been asked for wax. We certaily hve and sell it at £1.20 per ounce.

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  2. My daughter offered me some beeswax wraps in place of clingfilm. But when I thought about it the only thing I use cling film for is to wrap round paint brushes.

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    1. Ha Ha I know what you mean by the paintbrushes. I tend to use of bread bags.

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  3. I use beeswax granules (food grade) Rinse them down with lukewarm water after use. Every 3 or 4 months, iron between two sheets of greaseproof/parchment to revive the clinginess.

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    1. Yes they are easy to refresh aren't they? I don't really understand the food grade thingy. considering wax is a by product of harvesting honey, but I have seen it worded as such.

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  4. I made some of these for Christmas gifts for our sons, and made some for myself. I really like mine.

    God bless.

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    Replies
    1. I find them useful for odd shaped receptacles, such as jugs

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  5. I don't use cling film. I don't need it, and to be honest I have no idea how to use it anymore. I got a big roll of it 20yrs ago (almost to date) and at some point the jagged sharp edge of the box broke and I just couldn't bother to fix it. I still have that roll, but it's been st least 15 years since I've used it. I wanted to try beeswax wraps but then thought again - why would I make them, if I have no use to them? I use lidded containers, parchment paper or re-used plastic bags (like bread bags). I know, I'm a boring old fart.

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    Replies
    1. Deffo use bread bags etc and I place plates over bowls in the fridge.
      Agree re./ the sharp edge, absolutely lethal isn't it?

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  6. I make wraps and they are, indeed, very easy to make. If they get a bit crumpled, I do the iron and paper process again and they come out like new.
    xx

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    1. I like that they can be refreshed and that they fit all sorts of funny shapes if needed

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  7. For us non-beekeepers, their wax is very expensive, but I see your wraps are re-usable.

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    Replies
    1. Wax is between £1.00 and £1.50 an ounce depending on your source, which will do at least two large cloths and you just keep refreshing them so that they last for years.

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