Sunday, 30 April 2017

Her life in pinnys or is it aprons?

Hello again
A couple of weeks ago YGD who is nearly 12, came to stay and as is usual, wanted to bake. Out came the pinnys. She put on  the latest one she has been wearing, which was originally made for her older cousin. This one is made of pale green cotton twill, very hard wearing and meant to double up as his carpentry pinny. As he is now nearly 25 and 6' 3" he hasn't worn it in years! When YGD put it on, she only just managed to pull it over her head and it it came half way up her thighs. Time to get out the pinny I had made for her to give her later in the year. Putting GS's green pinny back I realised that it was joining a collection of no-longer-big-enough pinnys belonging to YGD. Why did I keep them? because we often have children visiting and they like to "do things". Here are the ones I found in the drawer... her life in pinnys.

While telling Good Friend  about the pinnys, as I knew he would be interested, being a collector of many things (including tea cosies and fans) I realised that we speak a different language. He calls them aprons, while I call them pinnys or pinafores. Mmmm is this a class thing or a district thing, a bit of both, a bit U and non-U ? So what do you call them? and what is the pinafore in HMS Pinafore? Neither GF nor I knew the answer.
Off to feed the 9 lambs that joined us last week. Pictures to follow.
Welcome to Marlene Snijders and Liane Peddlesden on the side bar and Ani K. Hill on Bloglovin. For some reason I can only see the blogs you follow and not if you have a blog.
Gillx

24 comments:

  1. Thank you! ( I do have a blog but it's mainly in Dutch, still wondering if I should write in English as well: http://marleenswereld.blogspot.nl/ )
    Isn't a pinny more like something you put over your clothes (like a jumper) as to an apron binding around you?

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    1. Tried to visit you and the page seems to be a general one about starting a blog!
      ooer yes you mean like a wrap over type thing?

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  2. A pinny has a bib. Am apron stops at the waist. Them's my two pennorth!

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    1. To the point and something I recognise, especially with the apron.

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    2. in our house a pinny was a half apron and an apron had the bib. dont forget the house coat!

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  3. My Granny called her cross over dress like coverall a pinny and anything that just covered the front was an apron. I don't worry about it and call them either one or the other depending on which word pops out of my mouth.

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    1. The cross over overall I remember well from when I was younger, but haven't seen them worn in years. All the women seemed to be busty who wore them !

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  4. Agree with Pam-apron was pretty and sometimes had a frill round it but a "peeny" was for wearing whilst working. The modern version that I now wear hasn't really got a bib as such and somehow I now call it an apron! Catriona

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    1. Yes, bibless does seem to be the way aprons are. Now we all need to agree re. pinnys.. bibs, pullovers or wrap overs?

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  5. Def "Lower Middle Class!" - a Pinny in our house! big or small. My grandma always wore a wrap round affair and I've just been looking at patterns for how to make one in case I want to dress up in 1940s stuff!

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    1. I was thinking that you don't see wrap over ones anymore. If I come across an old one I will take a pattern from it, then all that is needed is a headscarf knotted at the front and a pair of slippers and the 40s 50s look is cracked!

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  6. Momma called them aprons, she wore them all my life, probably all hers too. Her mother started her washing dishes at a young age, barely able to reach in the sink while standing on a ladder back chair. I still have the last one she wore, she went on to Jesus in 2003. I miss her.

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    1. Simple thoughts bring up strong memories don't they? My mother always wore a pinny as do I, but thimbles always make me think of her. I miss her too, just as much now as when she died in 2002 aged 88.

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  7. Growing up in England (Manchester) it was a pinny. Living in Canada it is an apron, nobody has even heard of a pinny.

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    1. I wonder if they have heard of a pinafore, such as those that little girls wore pulled over their dresses? Do the aprons in Canada have bibs?

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  8. I also grew up in the north of England and I now live in the Lake District. I remember my gran wearing a pinny which covered all her clothes. My mum always wore a frilly apron which was only from the waist down and fastened at the back.

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    1. That all definitely rings a bell with me. x

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  9. A man would never use the word 'Pinny'. For us it's an 'Apron'.

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    1. Ah you have introduced a new dimension to the mix! I am thinking on that now. Certainly woodworking/ metalworking cover ups would be aprons wouldn't they. As for painting ( as in pictures) were youa tunic sort of person?

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    2. I have one of those white coats (often accompanied by a large black bow) that is now so covered in paint that it's difficult to imagine that it was once white.

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  10. I have two pinnies and three aprons but I call them all pinnies! One of the aprons I made myself to use at craft fayres I used to attend, must dig out a photo. I always wear a pinny when baking and washing up and doing stuff around the house. I find one side gets dirtier than the other because of the way I dry my hands on them!

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    1. Oh yes, perfect for hand drying and helping to unscrew difficult lids and if they have a pocket for carrying pegs, hankies etc. Who would be without one?!

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  11. My gran used to always wear a pinny. It had 2 deep pockets on the front one for her cigarettes the other hankies. Then later on, she used to wear a full apron as she put the cordless phone in the pocket and the pinny only tied at the waist would drag down.

    When we were really little, she used to imperial mints in there in a little tin. If you could recite a poem or answer her times tables question you could have one! lol

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